Women in science

A blog for and about women in the sciences

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eternalacademic:

kqedscience:


Scientists Uncover a Surprising World of Microbes in Cheese Rind
“The rind of good cheese is a thriving microbial community. A single gram—a tiny crumb—contains 10 billion microbial cells, a mix of bacteria and fungi thatcontribute delicious and sometimes funky flavors. But even though humans have been making cheese for thousands of years, we know very little about what all those bugs are and how they interact.
Benjamin Wolfe and Rachel Dutton want to change that. The two scientists recently brought 137 cheeses from 10 countries into Dutton’s lab at Harvard University for genetic analysis. In a paper published July 17 in Cell, they and colleagues describe their findings, which include a few surprises—like the presence of bacteria commonly found in marine environments on cheeses made nowhere near an ocean.”
Learn more from wired.


I had the pleasure of meeting Rachel earlier this year and her research is pretty awesome - check it out!

eternalacademic:

kqedscience:

Scientists Uncover a Surprising World of Microbes in Cheese Rind

The rind of good cheese is a thriving microbial community. A single gram—a tiny crumb—contains 10 billion microbial cells, a mix of bacteria and fungi thatcontribute delicious and sometimes funky flavors. But even though humans have been making cheese for thousands of years, we know very little about what all those bugs are and how they interact.

Benjamin Wolfe and Rachel Dutton want to change that. The two scientists recently brought 137 cheeses from 10 countries into Dutton’s lab at Harvard University for genetic analysis. In a paper published July 17 in Cell, they and colleagues describe their findings, which include a few surprises—like the presence of bacteria commonly found in marine environments on cheeses made nowhere near an ocean.”

Learn more from wired.

I had the pleasure of meeting Rachel earlier this year and her research is pretty awesome - check it out!

203 notes

Women in Science.

saucefactory:

A mix dedicated to women in the sciences, be they the geniuses of the past, the trailblazers of the present or the masterminds of the future. All of the following songs feature women singing about science, or using scientific terms and themes in their lyrics.

Oh, and I’ve…

(via eternalacademic)

2,142 notes

shattered-earth:

I present, a microbiologist magical girl! Or a microbe magical girl, whichever you prefer i guess, with guest stars from Moyashimon Microbes!

This was a commission from a really cool MCB grad student, and i was more than happy to work on it because it combines so many many many of my favorite things :D I was basically given more or less free reign with some input on the science side of things, so cookies to people who see all the little references in the picture to microbiology and lab work :3 I may do a rework of this with generic microbes and not moyashimon ones to bring to otakon and awa as a print, but we’ll see in a week or two. 

I wanted to post this earlier but a giant headache basically pooped on the last 8 hours of my life v_v

Her staff is an inoculation loop. Too cute!

(via gender-and-science)

405 notes

bpod-mrc:

25 July 2014
The X File
This deceptively simple image revolutionised molecular biology. It also represents one of the most notorious controversies in science. ‘Photo 51’ was taken by Rosalind Franklin, who was born on this day in 1920. It is an x-ray crystallography image of DNA, created by bombarding a tiny DNA sample with x-rays for more than 60 hours. To most of us, this striped cross might not mean much, but to a few scientists in 1953 it held the secret to the structure of DNA. The controversy surrounds the instant Maurice Wilkins, who worked in Franklin’s lab, showed the photo to Francis Crick, a molecular biologist at Cambridge University, without Franklin’s knowledge. Crick published a paper with his colleague James Watson describing DNA’s double-helix structure. Wilkins, Crick and Watson shared the Nobel Prize in 1962. Franklin, whose peers never accepted her, died of cancer four years earlier, and couldn’t receive the prize posthumously.
Written by Nick Kennedy
—
Image by Rosalind Franklin and Raymond GoslinCopyright held by Oregon State University Libraries
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

25 July 2014

The X File

This deceptively simple image revolutionised molecular biology. It also represents one of the most notorious controversies in science. ‘Photo 51’ was taken by Rosalind Franklin, who was born on this day in 1920. It is an x-ray crystallography image of DNA, created by bombarding a tiny DNA sample with x-rays for more than 60 hours. To most of us, this striped cross might not mean much, but to a few scientists in 1953 it held the secret to the structure of DNA. The controversy surrounds the instant Maurice Wilkins, who worked in Franklin’s lab, showed the photo to Francis Crick, a molecular biologist at Cambridge University, without Franklin’s knowledge. Crick published a paper with his colleague James Watson describing DNA’s double-helix structure. Wilkins, Crick and Watson shared the Nobel Prize in 1962. Franklin, whose peers never accepted her, died of cancer four years earlier, and couldn’t receive the prize posthumously.

Written by Nick Kennedy

Image by Rosalind Franklin and Raymond Goslin
Copyright held by Oregon State University Libraries

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

(via eternalacademic)

140 notes

sweetteascience:

mindblowingscience:

New fellowship for gender equity in science

Australia’s first major fellowship designed to help scientists build their careers after taking time off to look after their children has been launched at The Australian National University (ANU).

The Judith Whitworth Fellowship for Gender Equality in Science has been established by the John Curtin School of Medical Research (JCSMR) at the ANU. It offers support for early- to mid-career scientists who have experienced significant career disruption as a result of maternity or parental leave.

Dr Julia Ellyard, a medical researcher and the chair of the JCSMR equity committee, said the Fellowship sent a strong signal that women had an important contribution to make to science.

“I think that this Fellowship provides hope for myself and my colleagues in a similar position, that there is a way to maintain your career over this difficult period when you are trying to balance the demands of a young family and get your research up and going again,” Dr Ellyard said.

Women who become parents or plan to have children abandon research careers up to twice as often as men in similar circumstances.

ACT Chief Minister Katy Gallagher launched the Fellowship and said the contribution made by these scientists was critical to maintaining scientific capability in research in Australia.

“It’s important to look at ways to minimize the impact that a career break can have,” she said.

The Fellowship is merit based and will provide up to two years of salary, plus research support of up to $50,000 for the successful candidate to re-establish scientific projects, strengthen their track record and regain national and international competitiveness when applying for independent external research funding.

The Fellowship is named in honour of Professor Judith Whitworth, past director of The John Curtin School of Medical Research.

“Gender equity is an important pillar of social justice,” Professor Whitworth said. “Female education and participation relates to the health of society, economic development, productivity and social stability.”

The Fellowship will be supported by The John Curtin School of Medical Research, The John Curtin Medical Research Foundation, and ANU Workplace giving program.

The first Fellowship is expected to start in January next year.

This is an awesome step. Way to lead the way Australia.

(via eternalacademic)